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Saif ed-Din Bokharzi & Bayan-Quli Khan Mausoleums Saif ed-Din Bokharzi & Bayan-Quli Khan Mausoleums In the settlement called Fathabad, to the east from medieval Bukhara city, in the past was situated vast religious complex. The initial core of the complex was the grave of Saif ed-Din al-Boharsi - very popular poet, sheikh, and theologian - who lived in thirteenth century. The followers of the sheikh al-Boharsi have built up at this area of rabad ("rabad" - an outskirt) many dormitories (khanakas) for dervishes, who lived there on donations of the Kubravi Sufi order members. The Fathabad settlement later had joined the city. More >>

Chashma-iy-Ayub Chashma-iy-Ayub Along the road leading from Samanid Park is situated another mausoleum - Chashma-iy-Ayub (Job's well) (Chashma-Ayub Mausoleum). It is a compound structure, repeatedly reconstructed during the period from the 14th till the 19th centuries. The structure finally acquired the form of an elongated prism crowned with domes of various forms covering several premises. A double conical dome, resting on a cylindrical drum, marks location of the well. More >>

Chor-Bakr Chor-Bakr Chor-Bakr (16-th - 17-th c.c.) is a necropolis in Sumitan settlement near to Bukhara. It has developed around the graves of Khodja Abu Bakr Sa'd and Imam Abu Bakr Ahmed, whose activity dates from the time of Islam dissemination in Bukhara. Their descendants - khojas of Juibar - were the keepers of esteemed burial places - mazars. (Khoja or Khwaja, a Persian word literally meaning "master", was used in Central Asia as a title of the descendants of the earliest four successors (righteous caliphs) of Mohammad (Abu-Bakr, Omar, Osmon and Ali). The khoja(s) often played, or aspired to play, ruling roles in Muslim community in Turkistan). More >>

Chor Minor Madrasah Chor Minor Madrasah Chor-Minor (also the Madrasah of Khalif Niyaz-kul) is situated on an esplanade down the road a bit to northeast from Labi-hauz. Chor-Minor i.e. "four minarets" (Chor Minor Madrasah) it is well-preserved structure built by Khalif Niyaz-kul - rich inhabitant of Bukhara, Turkmen by origin. The date of construction 1807 often indicated is not precise, because archival documents keep data, which prove, that in Bukhara at the close of the 17-th century there was a residential area (quarter) Khalif Niyaz-kul named after madrasah of the same name. More >>

Balyand Mosque Balyand Mosque An excellent example of a quarter ritual center is the Balyand Mosque in the western part of old Bukhara. The mosque belongs to the beginning of the 16-th century. It has a cube-shaped structure with adjoining colonnade. The Balyand Mosque is famous for its refined interior. Especially the paneling made of hexahedral glazed tiles painted with gold, which goes round the hall. The mosque took its name ("balyand" means "lofty") because of raised stone bed, on which rests the construction. More >>

Bolo-khauz Bolo-khauz Opposite the Ark is situated the Bolo-khauz Complex (Bolo Khauz Mosque) which is the only monument of the Registan square that survived through the years. In the water of the pond one can see a reflection of the colorfully painted eivan - a gallery with colonnade - and of the minaret. The earliest part of this complex is the pond ("khauz") called "Bolo-khauz" ("children's pond") - one of the few remaining ponds surviving in the city of Bukhara. Until the Soviet period there were many such ponds, which were the city's principal source of water, but they were notorious for spreading disease and were mostly cut off from water during the 1920s and 30s. More >>

The Baha-ud-Din Naqshband Complex The Baha-ud-Din Naqshband Complex The Baha-ud-Din Naqshband Complex (Bakhauddin Ensemble) is situated at the place of the former center of Sufi order (tariqa) Naqshbandi (Naqshbandiyya). This order is one of the major Sufi orders of Islam. Formed in 1380, the order is considered by some to be a "sober" order known for its silent dhikr (remembrance of God) rather than the vocalized forms of dhikr common in other orders. More >>

Kosh-Madrasah. Abdullakhan Madrasah Kosh-Madrasah. Abdullakhan Madrasah The sponsor of the Ensemble was Abdullah-khan II (1561-1598), the most successful khan of Shaibanid dynasty. Date of construction of the Abdullah-khan Madrasah is between 1588-90 years. The madrasah has very colorful and festive look because of variety of decorative methods. Chilled colors of majolica slabs: blue, white and aquamarine are sparkling by the sunlight. More >>

Abdulaziz-Khan Madrasah Abdulaziz-Khan Madrasah Abd al-Azis-khan Madrasah (1652-1662) (Abdullaziskhan Madrasah) makes up an architectural ensemble with Ulugbek Madrasah but is more luxurious in its decor. The portal is distinguished for its height and rich exterior ornamentation. The complete range of building techniques of its time were applied in the courtyard and rooms, namely carved tile and brick mosaic, relief majolica, marble carving, alabaster murals and gilding. More >>

Ark citadel & Grand mosque Ark citadel & Grand mosque The ancient fortress Ark is the initial core of the city, the oldest monument in Bukhara and formerly residence of the local rulers. The first settlements appeared at this place at least at the 3d century B.C. More >>

Juibariy Kalon Madrasah Juibariy Kalon Madrasah This Madrasah is located in historical residential area of Bukhara - Khauz-i-nau (New Pond). Construction of the madrasah, which wears a famous name Juibariy Kalon (Great Juibar), in Tadjik - Madrasayi Djuibor, according to a legend, was sponsored by Oi-posho-bibi - a blind (odjis) daughter of Djuibar ishan Khoja Sa'ad, nicknamed Khoja Kalon (Great Khoja). But intact waqf title deed (a waqf - Arabic:وقف - is an inalienable religious endowment in Islam, typically devoting a building or plot of land for Muslim religious or charitable purposes. It is conceptually similar to the common law trust) specifies that Oi-posho-bibi devoted a plot of land only; furthermore she was in actual fact a granddaughter of Great Khoja. Her father was Abdurahim-khodja. More >>

Faizabad khana-gah Faizabad khana-gah In the former northeast outskirts of the old part of the city, is located one of the most noble-looking monument in Bukhara - the Faizabad Khanaka, built in 1598-99. People of the mosque were inhabitants of residential quarter (neighborhood and unit of local self-government also "mahalla") called "Shohy Ahsy". The primary purpose of the mosque was to serve as a place for the five daily prayers (masjid-y panchvakty), as well as for "collective" prayers on Fridays (masjid-y jamihony). More >>

The fortified walls and gates in Bukhara The fortified walls and gates in Bukhara The real subjects of curiosity in Bukhara are fortified walls and gates. The section of the city wall with huge breaches in the brickwork is the good sample of fortification architecture. It is also an important element in the topography of the city, one that is closely associated with the history of Bukhara. More >>

Gaukushon Complex Gaukushon Complex One of the major ensembles in the center Bukhara is Khoja-Gaukushan (Gaukushon Complex). The madrasah was built in 1570 by order of Abdullah-khan II (1561-1598). He came to power with the help of Khoja Islam Juibariy - the powerful leader of local clan of Khoja(s). This clan - often identified as "Juibariya". Abdullah-khan was a disciple (murid) of Khoja Islam, therefore he always gave support to the clan. He built many religious and civil installations for them. More >>

Goziyon Madrasah Goziyon Madrasah The madrasah bears the name of historical residential area - Goziyon ("faith defenders") - one of the most important centers of Muslim education in pre-Soviet Bukhara. Goziyon had several Madrasahs that functioned till Russian Revolution of 1917. The largest of Goziyon - the madrasah of Mullo Mukhammad-Sharif - is lost. It was built in the early 19th century. The intact madrasah Goziyon-i Kalon (Great Goziyon) is one of two madrasahs of former so called "kosh" ensemble, which is typical of Bukhara. The word "kosh" means "paired" because two structures of the ensemble face one another across a street or square. Number two of the pair was Goziyon-i Hurd Madrasah (Small Goziyon). More >>

Grand mosque of the Ark Grand mosque of the Ark Inside the fortress leads the ascensional passage ("dalon"). Along the sides of the passage, the rooms for water and sand and prison cells are situated; twelve niches at the left and thirteen at the right of passage. Atop, opposite the passage dominates the gallery of the Grand mosque. It has a lay-out of big quarter mosque with one prayer room, framed with the portico on wooden pillars – a gallery (eivan/ iwan/ ivan,ivvan) over its three sides. The period of the Bukhara emirate under the government of emir Shahmurad (1785 - 1800) was the time of relative stability and prosperity. Emir Shahmurad nicknamed "sinless emir" carried out repairs of many of old structures in the Ark and built up new ones. Therefore, in all probability, the earlier building of Grand mosque on that place was rebuilt and reshaped during the government of emir Shahmurad. The building of Grand mosque has the signs of later reconstructions (made, admittedly, at the close of the 19-th century). More >>

Imam Kozi-hon Mazar Imam Kozi-hon Mazar Record of this mazar (a holy tomb) is contained in the "Mullo-zoda" book. This book mentions also full name of Imam Kozi-hon. It is Imam Khasan ben Mansur ben Mahmud ben Abdulazis Margilani. The record also mentions that Kozi-hon was a judge in Bukhara and he is an author of several books. People of Bukhara still remember an interesting narrative about him. More >>

Kalyan Minaret Kalyan Minaret "Po-i-Kalyan" is a word-combination, which in Persian means "the foot of the Great". This title was given to architectural complex (on Bukhara map Poi Kalyan Complex), which is located at the foot of the great minaret Kalyan. The complex is unmatched in Bukhara, forming unique silhouette of its historical center. The place where the complex is located remembers a few completely ruined buildings in the past. In pre-Islamic era right here was located the central cathedral of fire-worshippers. Since 713 here, at the site south of the Ark, several edifices of main cathedral mosque were built then razed, restored after fires and wars, and moved from place to place. More >>

Kalyan Mosque Kalyan Mosque "Po-i-Kalyan" is a word-combination, which in Persian means "the foot of the Great". This title was given to architectural complex (on Bukhara map Poi Kalyan Complex), which is located at the foot of the great minaret Kalyan. The complex is unmatched in Bukhara, forming unique silhouette of its historical center. The place where the complex is located remembers a few completely ruined buildings in the past. In pre-Islamic era right here was located the central cathedral of fire-worshippers. More >>

Karakul gate Karakul gate The ring of fortifications surrounded the suburbs in the period from 1540 to 1549 under Abd al-Aziz-khan the first. Researchers identify the names of eleven of the city gates (five of which were located in the extant area of the wall). Only two of them that was built towards the close of the 16th century are intact now: Talipach gate in the north and Karakul gate in the south-west. The Sheikh Djalal gate in the south has disappeared only recently. More >>

Khanaka of Khalifa Khudoydod Khanaka of Khalifa Khudoydod The Khalifa Khudoydod (locally Xalifa Xudoydod) Khanaka, ascribed to Khalifa Khudoydod (an eminent eshon - probably he bore the title Caliph - buried on the neighboring ancient cemetery - Eshoni Imlo), belongs to historical monuments of XVIII century. According to narrative, Khalifa Khudoydod lived more than 200 years ago and came to Bukhara from Urgench. Arguably Khalifa Khudoydod and sheikh Khudoyberdi, whose written biography is known as "Lutfiy Busurg", is the same person ("Khudoyberdi" in Turkic languages is a loan translation from "Khudoydod" in Persian). More >>

The Khanaka of Nadir Divan-begi (1619/20) The Khanaka of Nadir Divan-begi (1619/20) This Khanaka a rectangular edifice topped with a dome. The building has non-traditional narrow and prolate main portal along with two lateral entrances. The hall (dhikr-hana) has excellent acoustic properties. The inner walls of the hall are recessed with niches fringed with stucco moldings. The dwelling space occupies corners and lateral exterior walls of the building. The finishing of the main entrance gate is made quite conservatively, with an exception of some floral elements in ornamentation. The edges of the main portal are overworked with epigraphy ornaments. The main front of the khanaka is cornered with towers cut at a level of the walls. More >>

Khodja Zaynuddin Complex Khodja Zaynuddin Complex The Khoja Zain ad-Din Complex (Khodja Zaynuddin Complex), is the characteristic ritual structure - mosque-khanaka - of the first half of the 16-th century. Such structures often consist of a few premises of various purposes (mosque itself, khanaka (var. khana-gah), often madrasah, graveyard - mazar - and the like). The Khoja Zain ad-Din mosque-khanaka is situated on the verge of one of the oldest intact ponds. The pond had the marble walls and the carved marble spillway in the form of open jaws of a dragon (adjarkho). More >>

The Kosh Madrasah Ensemble The Kosh Madrasah Ensemble In the same district with the Samanid mausoleum and Chashma-iy-Ayub, not far from the park is situated one of the most interesting ensembles of Bukhara "Kosh-Madrasah" (Kosh Madrasah Ensemble), which is typical of Bukhara. The word "Kosh" means "paired" because two structures of the ensemble face one another across a narrow street. The sponsor of the Ensemble was Abdullah-khan II (1561-1598), the most successful khan of Shaibanid dynasty. In 974 A.H. (1566-67) he built up the Modari-khan Madrasah in memory of his mother (“Modari-khan” means “mother of khan”). The date of construction is inserted in majolica inscription above the main entrance. As to composition of structure, the madrasah has fairly standard layout including a dormitory, which consists of small cells (hudjras) around a courtyard, public halls of a mosque and lecture-rooms (darskhana) along both sides of front. The facade (peshtaq) of the madrasah has gorgeous appearance because of multicolor brick mosaic. More >>

The Kukeldash Madrasah (1568/69) The Kukeldash Madrasah (1568/69) The word "kukeldash" literally means "foster-brother". In a hierarchy of power inherited from Genghis-khan this word designates one of the most important positions of khans' court. The sponsor of Kukeldash Madrasah was highly influential emir Kulbaba, who held a post of Kukeldash under several khans of the Shaibanid dynasty. It is historically proven, that emir Kulbaba Kukeldash gave help to Abdulla-khan II (1561-1598) - the most powerful khan of the Shaibanid dynasty - to come to power. According to the hallowed tradition of consecration of the khan inherited from Mongols - in the states that appeared after disintegration of the empire - each new khan ought to be lifted lying on the sheet of white felt. The power to strain the sheet from four corners had four men recognized as most influential figure in a commonwealth. Emir Kulbaba was one of four men who consecrated Abdulla-khan II. The title "khan" could be given only to "tore" - agnate lineal descendant of Genghis-khan. More >>

Kuleta caravanserai Kuleta caravanserai Western passage of Taq-i Telpaq Furushon opens to the street Mekhtar Ambar. The first building on the right that adjoins to the wall of Taq-i Telpaq Furushon is the ancient caravanserai Kuleta (16th century). A caravanserai (Persian: كاروانسرا, Turkish: kervansaray) was a roadside inn where travelers could rest and recover from the day's journey. Caravanserais supported the flow of commerce, information, and people across the network of trade routes covering Asia, North Africa, and South-Eastern Europe. Most typically it was a building with a square or rectangular walled exterior, with a single portal wide enough to permit large or heavily laden beasts such as camels to enter. More >>

Kurpa Mosque Kurpa Mosque Western passage of Taq-i Telpaq Furushon opens to the street Mekhtar Ambar. A little in front on the left, stands out the Kurpa Mosque in its unrenewed grace. The Kurpa Mosque is situated in the residential quarter, formerly called "Magoki Kurpa", i.e." Hollow of blanket(s' bazaar)". The two-storied structure of the Kurpa Mosque has a quite typical design. However the mosque has one peculiarity. The lower floor, made for a cold spell in winter, is semi-basement. At first sight, an entrance to the lower floor does not give an intimation that it leads to a roomy premise of cathedral mosque. It is exactly what the mosque initially was assigned to be. Until the Khoja Kalon Mosque was put into operation, the Kurpa mosque used to be a central cathedral mosque, no matter how small it was. The Kurpa Mosque had tahorathona - a place for partial ablution, which, according to sharia law, should precede each prayer. The mosque was built before 1598 on initiative of Khoja Sa'ad - called "Khoja Kalon" - "Great Khoja", the son of Khoja Islam. In 1598 Khoja Sa'ad built new cathedral mosque, named "Khoja Mosque" or "Khoja Kalon Mosque", with tall minaret close to the Gaukushan Madrasah. More >>

The Lyabi Khauz Ensemble The Lyabi Khauz Ensemble The Labi Khauz, i.e. "at the pond", is the title given to the area surrounding one of the few remaining Hauz or ponds surviving in the city of Bukhara. Until the Soviet period there were many such ponds, which were the city's principal source of water, but they were notorious for spreading disease and were mostly filled in during the 1920s and 30s. The Lyab-i Hauz survived because it is the centrepiece of a magnificent architectural ensemble, created during the 16th and 17th centuries, which has not been significantly changed since. The ensemble comprises three monumental structures: Kukeldash Madrasah in the north, Khanaka (1619-20) in the west and Nadir divan-begi Madrasah (1622/23) (on Bukhara map Nodir Devan-Begi Madrasah) in the east. The small Qazi-e Kalyan Nasreddin madrasah (now demolished) was formerly located beside the Kukeldash Madrasah. More >>

Mullo Tursunjon Madrasah Mullo Tursunjon Madrasah At the third decade of the 16-th century Bukhara became a capital of Bukhara khanate, under the government of Shaibanid dynasty. The whole period when this dynasty was in power is about one century since the beginning of the 16-th century. Shaibanids carried out many reforms during this time. In particular they instituted a number of measures to better system of the public education. Each residential quarter (neighborhood and unit of local self-government also "mahalla") of Bukhara had a hedge-school. Prosperous families provided home education to their children. Children started elementary education from six years. After two years they could be taken to a madrasah. More >>

The Magak-i Attari Mosque The Magak-i Attari Mosque Before the Arab conquest there was a bazaar close by the site of the Magak-i Attari Mosque (Magoki Attoron Mosque), i.e. the "Mosque in pit". It was a market for idols, potions and spices - attar (perfumes). Besides this, there, was formerly a Temple of the moon (Mokh) at this place. Abu Bakr Muhammad ibn al-Narshakhi of Bukhara, who had completed his book in 943 A.D. (A.H. 332), mentions the mosque, which was built on the site of former Mokh Temple. He used the name "magok", i.e. "in a pit", because even then half of it was concealed from view by the rising soil level. Hence, the mosque, perhaps, is one of the earliest religious buildings of Islamic era in Bukhara. Choice of place for the mosque also proves this assumption, because Arab conquerors built their sanctuaries first of all at the places of prostrated cults. In Bukhara, it had taken place at least once more; the very first cathedral mosque was built at the place of destroyed temple of fire-worshippers. There is opinion that the Kalyan Mosque was afterwards built exactly at that place. More >>

The Mir-i-Arab Madrasah (1535-1536) The Mir-i-Arab Madrasah (1535-1536) The construction of Mir-i-Arab Madrasah ( Miri Arab Madrasah) is ascribed to Sheikh Abdullah Yamani of Yemen - called Mir-i-Arab - the spiritual mentor of Ubaidullah-khan and his son Abdul-Aziz-khan. Ubaidullah-khan waged permanent successful war with Iran. At least three times his troops seized Herat. Each of such plundering raids on Iran was accompanied by capture of great many captives. They say that Ubaidullah-khan had invested money gained from redemption of more than three thousand Persian captives into construction of Mir-i-Arab Madrasah. More >>

Modari-khan Madrasah Modari-khan Madrasah The sponsor of the Ensemble was Abdullah-khan II (1561-1598), the most successful khan of Shaibanid dynasty. In 974 A.H. (1566-67) he built up the Modari-khan Madrasah in memory of his mother (“Modari-khan” means “mother of khan”). The date of construction is inserted in majolica inscription above the main entrance. As to composition of structure, the madrasah has fairly standard layout including a dormitory, which consists of small cells (hudjras) around a courtyard, public halls of a mosque and lecture-rooms (darskhana) along both sides of front. The facade (peshtaq) of the madrasah has gorgeous appearance because of multicolor brick mosaic. More >>

The Namazgoh Mosque The Namazgoh Mosque Namazgoh (Namazgokh Mosque) is one of the oldest constructions of Bukhara in the South of present-day city. The first known Namazgoh at this place was developed in the 9-th century, during the reign of the Samanid dynasty. One of the characters of this time is stabilization of the power under Islam ideology. Because of it, Bukhara became one of the major Islamic centers on the East. It was the time of general construction of ritual buildings (mosques, namazgohs), educational institutions (madrasahs) and other structures peculiar to usages of new religion such as khanaka, minaret and so on. More >>

The Nadir Divan-Begi Madrasah (1622/23) The Nadir Divan-Begi Madrasah (1622/23) Originally Nadir Divan-begi intended the building to be a caravanserai (not that it was allowed to portray human or animal figures on them either but it was marginally better than on a madrasah). But at the inauguration ceremony, Imam Quli-khan unexpectedly proclaimed the supposed caravanserai is to be a madrasah. So Nadir Divan-begi was obliged to rearrange the caravanserai, by adding on to the front the loggias and angular towers. He also constructed an additional storey with cells (hujras). At the same time the madrasah does not have a lecture room! The entrance portal has depictions of 2 phoenix birds, 2 misshapen white deer and a "man-in-the-sun" face. More >>

The Poi Kalyan Complex The Poi Kalyan Complex "Po-i-Kalyan" is a word-combination, which in Persian means "the foot of the Great". This title was given to architectural complex, which is located at the foot of the great minaret Kalyan. The complex is unmatched in Bukhara, forming unique silhouette of its historical center. The place where the complex is located remembers a few completely ruined buildings in the past. In pre-Islamic era right here was located the central cathedral of fire-worshippers. Since 713 here, at the site south of the Ark, several edifices of main cathedral mosque were built then razed, restored after fires and wars, and moved from place to place. In 1127, the Karakhanid ruler Arslan-khan fulfilled a construction of most significant of past architecture ensembles at this place - the cathedral mosque with the minaret. Greatness of these structures was so amazing, that it made Genghis-khan to consider mosque mistakenly to be khans' palace. Nevertheless the building of mosque was not spared by the fire, and for many years after the conflagration it was laying in ruins. All that remained intact of former ensemble is the magnificent minaret Kalyan (Minara-yi-Kalyan). More >>

Samanid Mausoleum Samanid Mausoleum The Samanid mausoleum is located in the historical urban nucleus of the city of Bukhara, in a park laid out on the site of an ancient cemetery. The mausoleum, one of the most esteemed sights of Central Asian architecture, was erected by the Samanid ruler Ismail Samani sometime before 943 AD. An existing waqf document indicates that it was possibly built for his father. Although three bodies lie within, a wooden plaque identifies only Ismail's grandson, Nasr ibn Ahmad ibn Ismail or as-Said Nasr II (d. 943). Ostensibly the family crypt of the last Persian dynasty to rule in Central Asia, which held the city in the 9th and 10th centuries, it is possible that, consistent with popular nomenclature, the structure does indeed contain the grave of Ismail Samani himself. More >>

The Sitora-I-Mohi-Hosa Palace The Sitora-I-Mohi-Hosa Palace The summer-palace of Bukhara emir Sitora-I-Mohi-Hosa (Sitora-i-Mohi-Khosa) (from Persian "House of the Moon and the Star") is located at a distance of 4 kilometers (2,5 miles) to the north from Bukhara. The construction of the palace had began at the end of the 19-th century, when the best artisans sent by the order of the Bukhara emir Ahadhan to St. Petersburg and Yalta for studying of experience of Russian architects had returned from Russia. Therefore, architecture of the ensemble is a mix of the elements typical for European architecture with ornate interior design of Isfahan palaces and the centuries-old experience of local construction traditions. More >>

Talipach gate Talipach gate Researchers identified the names of eleven of city gates (five of which were in the extant area of the wall). Only two of them are intact now: Talipach gate in the north and Karakul gate in the south-west. The date of their building is the end of the 16th century. The Sheikh Djalal gate in the south recently went to ruin. More >>

Taq-i Telpaq Furushon Taq-i Telpaq Furushon The intersections of main streets of medieval Bukhara served a purpose of trade, that caused a construction there of notable domed structures – taq(s) and tim(s). Passing by Po-i Kalyan northwardly one can reach a place of ancient four bazaars ("Chakhar suk" or "Chorsu"). There is situated the first of such structures, called Chorsu or Taq-i Zargaron ("zargaron" means "jeweler"). Shortly after Tim Abdullakhan the same street leads to southeast where it meets northern passageway of Taq-i Telpaq Furushon (Toki Telpak Furushon Trading Dome). Besides this street four more streets at different angles reach the structure. Architects met a challenge by making passageways for each street between six radially placed pylons carrying a low cylindrical cupola (of 14.5 meters in diameter) with dodecahedral skylight. The galleries with niches and storerooms around the central hall are located on twelve inner 12 axes. Taq-i Telpaq Furushon was a shopping mall mainly of fur and other kind of head-dresses such as skullcaps embroidered with gold-thread and beads, fur-hats, and skillfully rolled turbans. More >>

Tim Abdullakhan Trading Dome Tim Abdullakhan Trading Dome A cowded street encumbered with caravanserais and rows of stalls once led to the south from Taq-i Zargaron. The arcade Tim Abdullah-khan (1577) (Tim Abdullakhan Trading Dome) became the dominating structure at that street in the epoch of Abdullah-khan II (1561-1598), the most successful khan of the Shaibanid dynasty. More >>

Ulugbek Madrasah Ulugbek Madrasah The Ulugh Beg Madrasah (1417+) (Ulugbek Madrasah) is the only structure of such scale in Bukhara, which remained from the epoch of the Timuride dynasty. Ulugh Beg (March 22, 1394 - October 27, 1449), born Muhammad Taragai ibn Shakhrukh ibn Timur Gurgan. Ulugh Beg, meaning "Great Ruler" or "Patriarch Ruler" was the grandson of Timur and the son of Shakhrukh. Ulugh Beg was born in Sultaniyeh in Iran. He showed an aptitude for scientific pursuits from an early age. His father and grandfather attracted scholars to Samarkand, and Ulugh Beg took full advantage of this. With Timur's death, and the accession of Ulugh Beg's father to much of the Timurid Empire, Ulugh Beg settled in Samarkand which had been Timur's capital. After Shah Rukh moved the capital to Herat (in modern Afghanistan), sixteen-year-old Ulugh Beg became the governor in Samarkand in 1409. In 1411 he became a sovereign of the whole Mavarannahr khanate. More >>

Valida-i Abd al-Aziz-khan Madrasah Valida-i Abd al-Aziz-khan Madrasah The initial core of Valida-i Abd al-Aziz-khan Madrasah was Abdulla-khan Mosque. It is the ancient domical building, sponsored by Abdulla-khan's mother. The Mosque has served for the five daily prayers (masjid-y panchvakty), as well as for "collective" prayers on Fridays (masjid-y jamihony). Buildings of the Mosque was subjected to numerous reconstructions during a time, and this religious complex (opposite the Djuibory Kalon Madrasah) had been given the name - Valida-i Abd al-Aziz-khan (Voliday Abdullazizkhan Madrasah), which also carries us away to the past, when this area bore the name of this great man. More >>

Valida-i Abd al-Aziz-khan Madrasah Valida-i Abd al-Aziz-khan Madrasah The initial core of Valida-i Abd al-Aziz-khan Madrasah was Abdulla-khan Mosque. It is the ancient domical building, sponsored by Abdulla-khan's mother. The Mosque has served for the five daily prayers (masjid-y panchvakty), as well as for "collective" prayers on Fridays (masjid-y jamihony). Buildings of the Mosque was subjected to numerous reconstructions during a time, and this religious complex (opposite the Djuibory Kalon Madrasah) had been given the name - Valida-i Abd al-Aziz-khan (Voliday Abdullazizkhan Madrasah), which also carries us away to the past, when this area bore the name of this great man. More >>

Zindan Zindan In times of Soviet regime, the Zindan in Bukhara symbolized the despotism of overthrown government. But in fact, the state itself, which accused the local rulers of despotism, had enormous number of prisoners. Zindan is an ancient prison, which could receive no more than 40 people, basically debtors and religio-ethical-rule-breakers. In compare with number of inhabitants of Bukhara, this quantity was laughable. That is evidence the low rate of crimes in Bukhara. One Islamic principle that is directly related to prisons is freedom. A fundamental rule says that freedom is an aim of the Law-Giver. A prison, therefore, could not be used to restrain people's freedoms unless it is judged that this freedom will cause the society substantial harm. Otherwise, every precaution should be taken before people's freedom is compromised by imprisonment. More >>

Ghujdawan Ghujdawan Ghujdawan - a district administrative centre along the road to Samarkand - is famous first of all as a native place of Abdul Khaliq al-Ghujdawani, the founder of Sufi order (tarica) called Khwajaganiyya the predecessor of Naqshbandiyya. Together with Ahmad Yasavi young Abdul Khaliq Ghujdawani was one of four successors of Yusuf ibn al-Husayn al-Hamadani (the prominent Sufi master of his time). Al-Ghujdawani has died in about 1220 when he was 95. In 1433, to the west of al-Ghujdawani's mazar, by order of Ulugh Beg, was built the latest of three his madrasahs. More >>

The Khanaka of Kosim-sheikh  The Khanaka of Kosim-sheikh Kosim-sheikh was an acknowledged religious leader during the reign of Abdullah-khan II (1561-1598), the most successful khan of Shaibanid dynasty. His body was laid to rest in Kermine (at present time Nawoiy). However one of urban quarters in Bukhara formerly bore the name of Kosim-sheikh. There also is a mazar, known as the holy grave of Kosim-sheikh. Near to the mazar there is a well. People consider that water from this well is curative, believing that Kosim-sheikh miraculously made the well. In Kermine there is a big khanaka-mosque (XVI), called the Khanaka of Kosim-sheikh. More >>

The minaret in Vabkent The minaret in Vabkent The minaret in Vabkent is one of the most refined works of local architecture. The date of the beginning of its construction (1196-97) is visible in the form of Kufic inscription in the lower decorative belt round the trunk of the minaret. The inscription also mentions the name of Burkhan-ad-Din Ayud-al-Aziz II, who probably ordered the construction. In the upper decorative belt it is written in the form of Divani inscription that the minaret was completed in 595 A.H., i.e. in 1198-99. More >>

Rabat-i-Malik and the Malik sardoba Rabat-i-Malik and the Malik sardoba On the roadside in the Malik Steppe, one can see the portal of the 12th century, which leads to the ruins of the fortress Rabat-i-Malik -"Prince's rabat". The word "rabat" means "castle", or "fortress". It refers to the fortified settlements and places of rest along caravan routes. During the heyday of the Silk Road, travelers and merchants gathered within the walls of this fortress on the road from Samarkand to Bukhara. The remainders of finishing - carved stucco, figured ornamental brickwork and unglazed carved ceramics - give food for reflection about the lost beauty. More >>

Bukhara Hotels Bukhara Hotels Bukhara hotels. Hotels in Bukhara. Information. Booking More >>

Tashkent sights

Samarkand sights

Khiva sights





Tours in Uzbekistan

Tours

WADU 01. Adventures in Uzbekistan WADU 01. Adventures in Uzbekistan
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Incentive tours to Uzbekistan Incentive tours to Uzbekistan
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WCUZ 01. Classic Uzbekistan WCUZ 01. Classic Uzbekistan
Price: 680 USD 
Country Hotels Uzbekistan Country Hotels Uzbekistan
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WCUZ 03. Uzbekistan - Oriental Fairy Tale WCUZ 03. Uzbekistan - Oriental Fairy Tale
Price: 630 USD 
WCUZ 02. All Uzbekistan WCUZ 02. All Uzbekistan
Price: 1700 USD 
WCUT 01. From Kyzylkum Desert up to Tien-Shan Mountains WCUT 01. From Kyzylkum Desert up to Tien-Shan Mountains
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WCUT 02. To UNESCO World Heritage in Central Asia WCUT 02. To UNESCO World Heritage in Central Asia
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WCUT 03. Along Alexander Macedonskiy Road WCUT 03. Along Alexander Macedonskiy Road
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WUTK 01. Pamir – The Roof of the World WUTK 01. Pamir – The Roof of the World
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WEFU 01. Mountain flowers in Uzbekistan WEFU 01. Mountain flowers in Uzbekistan
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WCRU 01. On Baktrian camel through Kyzyl-Kum desert WCRU 01. On Baktrian camel through Kyzyl-Kum desert
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WHKU 02. To the source of Paltau-say WHKU 02. To the source of Paltau-say
Price: 70 USD 
WJUZ 01. On Jeeps to Aral Sea through Kizil-kums WJUZ 01. On Jeeps to Aral Sea through Kizil-kums
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Tour to Fergana Valley Tour to Fergana Valley
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Fergana valley - Garden of Uzbekistan Fergana valley - Garden of Uzbekistan
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WCRU 01. On Baktrian camel through Kyzyl-Kum desert WCRU 01. On Baktrian camel through Kyzyl-Kum desert
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Uzbekistan Hotels in Tashkent Samarkand Bukhara Khiva Uzbekistan Hotels in Tashkent Samarkand Bukhara Khiva
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Bukhara Hotels Bukhara Hotels
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Samarkand Hotels Samarkand Hotels
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Khiva Hotels Khiva Hotels
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Tashkent Hotels Tashkent Hotels
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Uzbekistan Mountaineering

Mountaineering

Country Hotels Uzbekistan Country Hotels Uzbekistan
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Uzbekistan Mountain Rafting Uzbekistan Mountain Rafting
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Uzbekistan Mountain Hiking Uzbekistan Mountain Hiking
Price: 40 USD 
Uzbekistan Mountain Trekking Uzbekistan Mountain Trekking
Price: 225 USD 
Uzbekistan Mountain Canyoning Uzbekistan Mountain Canyoning
Price: 137 USD 
Uzbekistan Mountain Climbing Uzbekistan Mountain Climbing
Price: 137 USD 
Uzbekistan Mountain Waterfalling Uzbekistan Mountain Waterfalling
Price: 67 USD 
Rock Climbing Festival in Yangiabad Rock Climbing Festival in Yangiabad
Price: 200 USD 
Uzbekistan Snowboarding & Snow-skiing Uzbekistan Snowboarding & Snow-skiing
Price: 550 USD 
Heli-skiing Uzbekistan Heli-skiing Uzbekistan
Price: 3500 USD 
Uzbekistan Mountain Horseback-Riding Uzbekistan Mountain Horseback-Riding
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Hotel Nebesa, Resort

Crokus Park Resort, Hotel in Charvak. Cottages, Price
 
Uzbekistan Tashkent - Uzbekistan Hotel  Chimgan: Snow Conditions & Ski Report  Travel and Tourism Central Asia  Uzbekistan hotels  Trekking in Fann Mountains  
 
 

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